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Tuesday, July 31, 2012

Garden Tour - Ryan Miller's Garden

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This past weekend I had the privilege of visiting a friend and fellow blogger's garden. I actually met Ryan Miller (gnomiscience) through our blogs a year or so ago...but have never actually visited his garden before, so it was pretty exciting to finally see it in person.

Ryan Millers Garden  1957
I was lucky enough to be accompanied by Mrs. danger garden herself, Loree...there's nothing better than a day spent with garden folk, right? As we pulled up, we were met with the front yard plantings, seen above, which consists of some tough, xeric plants. As always, the combination of blue/purple with yellow is especially electric.

Ryan Millers Garden  1965Ryan Millers Garden  1960
Anaphalis margaritacea, Rudbeckia hirta, Liatris spicataMacleaya cordata & Verbascum bombyciferum 'Arctic Summer'
Of course, any time I see Rudbeckia and Liatris in a garden, it makes me happy...such great, tough prairie plants. The Macleaya is wonderful for it's statuesque height and wonderful, textural foliage. The blooms are a nice added bonus.

Ryan Millers Garden  1961
Cynara cardunculus (Cardoon)
Ryan's front garden is really dominated by a large Cardoon...which was blooming resplendently during our visit...how can you not love those huge, glowing blooms!

Ryan Millers Garden  1962Ryan Millers Garden  1959
Digitalis ferrungeaEryngium planum
Ryan has all manner of intersting and unusual plants, many of which he has grown from seed. Take this Digitalis ferrungea...good luck finding that in a nursery! I think we all love Eryngiums (and there are SO MANY to choose from)...a bonus, they are almost universally loved by pollinators.

Ryan Millers Garden  1958
The "Front Garden" - Anaphalis margaritacea, Rudbeckia hirta, Liatris spicata, Sedum spectabile, Rhus typhina
Again, just a gorgeous mix of color and texture...and just imagine what it will look like once the Sedum joins the fray!

Ryan Millers Garden  1956
The "side-yard" garden
The part of Ryan's garden that's most impressive to me is the side yard...because he built that entire retaining wall (and it's WAAAAYYY longer than I had imagined) all by himself!

Ryan Millers Garden  1971
Lobelia cardinalis 'Queen Victoria'
How can you not love the rich, sultry red foliage of this Lobelia...especially backed with those smoldering orange Crocosmias.

Ryan Millers Garden  1949Ryan Millers Garden  1948
Tigridia pavoniaLobelia laxiflora
Among Ryan's plants are some I've never actually seen in person before, Like this Tigridia...which he has a variety of colors of. The Lobelia really captured my eye...I honestly don't think photos quite do it justice...it's just so delicately graceful.

Ryan Millers Garden  1970
Lobelia laxiflora
Another photo of the Lobelia...because it's just so pretty :-)

Ryan Millers Garden  1943
Penstemon 'Husker's Red' seedpods
The flowers of this Penstemon are pleasant enough...but the seedpods are outstanding!

Ryan Millers Garden  1947Ryan Millers Garden  1944
Asclepias SpeciosaLobelia & Crocosmia
I was so happy to see my favorite Asclepias in Ryan's garden...love those silvery-mauve flowers...but even more so, the crazy, spiny seed-pods that follow.

Ryan Millers Garden  1966
Artemisia lactiflora 'Guizhou'
I've read that this Artemisia can be a bit thuggish...but it seemed quite well-behaved in Ryan's garden...and indeed, a perfect foil for its more intensely-colored companions. I meant to ask what the grass was in the background...I'm guessing Panicum 'Heavy Metal'.

Ryan Millers Garden  1953Ryan Millers Garden  1968
Echinacea 'Tiki Torch'Echinacea 'Hot Lava'
I'll admit, I prefer the plain old purple Echinacea...but even I had to stop and gape at these amazing hybrids...maybe I'll try a few someday!

Ryan Millers Garden  1942
Hypericum shrub
I could not for the life of me figure out what this was before asking Ryan...isn't it cool!

Ryan Millers Garden  1974
Hydrangea
I love these old Lace-Cap style Hydrangeas...I just find them casually elegant...and the color is wonderful.

Ryan Millers Garden  1975
Hyndragea & neighbor's Nandina
This may be cheating a bit...the Nandina is in the neighbor's yard...but I loved the combination with the Hydrangea!

So, thanks again, Ryan...it was a blast seeing your garden (and enjoying your Water Kefir)!

43 comments:

  1. What a beautiful garden! Your photography is incredible. How does he garden in the packed plantings along the big raised bed? I'd probably trip, fall out, and break something. :o)

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    1. Hahahahaha...I thought the same thing...I'm so clutzy!

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  2. Wow! Just beautiful! It's like jumping back 6-8 weeks -- we're so far ahead of you here. Sigh.

    So when are you and Loree coming to visit my garden? ;-)

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    1. Isn't it funny how out-of-sync we all are this year...bizarre! Well, now that we're officially invited, hopefully soon :-)

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  3. I was so bummed I couldn't make this one! Thank you for taking me there virtually. :) I can't believe that retaining wall--WOW.

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    1. You can only see about half the retaining wall in that photo. Building was the easy part. Removing over 8 tons of sod and earth by hand, that was the hard part.

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    2. We missed you, Heather! It's true...I forgot my wider-angle lens...so couldn't get the entire fence in the frame!

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  4. How did you so discreetly snap all of these beautiful images? I realized later I didn't even take my camera out of my bag (I think I was overwhelmed at all the plants I didn't know...and look at you, names on every one!), at the very least I should have captured those darling little Agaves so all the world knows Ryan has a bit of danger in his garden.

    (Ryan I'm still jealous of that beautiful Cardoon)

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    1. yeah Scott, I can't believe you were able to name all those plants from memory! ;-)
      Loree, Cardoon's are dangerous too! Highland warriors use them as deadly clubs, in olden times.

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    2. Hahahahaha...I have to 'fess up...I totally harassed Ryan into telling me what the plants were!

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  5. Another lovely garden. I think we lost one of our rudbeckias in the spring (I suspect slugs in the wet weather) and the remaining one is not in bloom yet - will have to sow more seed. Very pretty lobelia too.

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    1. Isn't that Lobelia something else! So sad about your Rudbeckia :-( I had a few things that really struggled to come up this spring too.

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  6. You made me appreciate Ryan's garden all over again and in new ways, too. I agree with Loree - I don't understand how you managed all these shots, and the names to go with them. Outstanding job capturing both the delicacy and the strength of Ryan's plantings, Scott!

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    1. It was so good seeing you there, Jane! I am a photo ninja ;-)

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  7. Stunning photography as usual and what a lovely garden. I'll head over to Ryan's site for more garden voyeurism. Love to see what others are growing.

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    1. Thanks, Tom...I love it too...so fun to see the personality of people in what they plant ;-)

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  8. I wasn't able to make it either so I'm so grateful for your terrific post. And that Digitalis is wonderful--what a pretty color!

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    1. thanks! I will have seeds to share this Fall if you like

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    2. I love that Digitalis...such a nice, rusty color

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  9. These shots are great. Wonderful post and garden tour. Love that hydrangea shot...incredible!

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    1. Thanks, Ricki...hope to see you at the next open garden ;-)

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  11. thanks for making my garden look and sound so lovely Scott!

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  12. I was admiring his ' Queen Victoria' on my visit, then got home home to find mine very sad and limp,
    Wonderful photos of the garden, makes me want another look.

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    1. Oh no! I do find that Lobelias seem to be pretty bratty about water and heat. It's one of the few plants I give a little extra water (on top of regular watering) from time to time.

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  13. the artemisia is intriguing. Nice photos and tour.

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    1. I agree, Greggo...I really like the texture of them.

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  14. How nice to visit a fellow blogger's garden and meet up with another blogger as well. I have never seen such a lush Queen Victoria Lobelia. I bought one and the bunnies are it down to a nub. I moved it and hope it will thrive, but still pretty small. Love the purples and yellows together.

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    1. Isn't that Lobelia a beauty! I'll cross my fingers that the bunnies won't find yours again ;-)

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  15. Fantastic photos of a luscious garden!

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    1. Thanks, Kate...sad you couldn't make it :-(

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  16. What a lot of unusual and distinctive plants, so pretty! Taking notes now...

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    1. He has some very neat plants, for sure!

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  17. I love the colors! It is really pretty. I am glad that for your garden. Cool!

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  18. WOW!! Congrats to Ryan on what looked like an awesome open! Great photos as always, Scott!

    R

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  19. Wow - that sums it all up. Gorgeous garden and pictures. I've just moved to Portland, from GA, to a rental with a teeny yard. Am so looking forward to next year when we get a house. Right now I'm living vicariously thru your Blog Scott and others that you link to. Rabbits always ate my Rudebekia. I love them along with the regular purple echinacea, but the other colors are very interesting.

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  20. There's nothing like a garden tour with garden blogging friends! Thanks for sharing your visit to Ryan's garden. It's lovely.

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