Saturday, September 15, 2012

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day - September 2012

GBBD September 2012
Happy Bloom Day everyone! I hope September is going well for all you out there! I have to admit, I've barely been able to enjoy the garden these past few weeks...work has been crazy...and I often don't get home until it's already dark :-(

I'm officially OVER summer now...and I think the garden feels the same. While things are still looking pretty good, I can definitely see the effects this prolonged heat and dryness have had on the garden. Actually, just driving around Portland, I see it everywhere. It's dry, dusty and in need of a good shower!

Anyway, without further ado...here's what's going on right now in my garden...I'll keep my chit-chat to a minimum to speed things along :-)

vernonia  2202
Vernonia missurica
The blooms of Vernonia always take my by surprise...they are wonderfully intense...so welcome at this time of year!

verbena rigida polaris  2152
Verbena rigida 'Polaris'
Verbena rigida is a great, easy-to-grow plant...I can't recommend it enough.

verbena  2158
Verbena bonariensis
Of course, if you've ever grown Verbena bonariensis, chances are you now have more than you could ever possibly use...but I never tire of it's cheerful, carefree blooms.

teucrium  2168salvia black & blue  2172
TeucriumSalvia 'Black & Blue'

selinum wallichianum  2174
Selinum wallichianum
My Selinum have become some of my favorite plants...and truly exceptional umbel...graceful in every way. I probably shouldn't have put it in the hell-strip (as it's about the only plant I begrudgingly water).

rudbeckia panicum sunset  2209
Rudbeckia 'Goldsturm' & Panicum 'Shenandoah'
A classic prairie-inspired combo...especially lovely in afternoon light.

persicaria red dragon  2161
Persicaria 'Red Dragon'
The flowers of 'Red Dragon' are small...but very numerous. Luckily, this Persicaria doesn't seem to reseed.

sedum vera jamison  2176sedum matrona  2207
Sedum 'Bertram Anderson'Sedum 'Matrona'

persicaria inverleith  2160
Persicaria 'Inverleith'
This Persicaria is such a great plant...but I learned this summer that it is not quite as able to resist heat as others in it's family. It scorched badly, but is now looking pretty good again.

persicaria firetail  2215
Persicaria 'Firetail'
A wonderful standby...and so easy to please. I adore those long, wispy red tapers...such a nice contrast to the Geranium 'Rozanne' at its feet.

rudbeckia triloba  2218persicaria polymorpha  2193
Rudebckia trilobaPersicaria polymorpha

anemone september charm  2151
Anemone 'September Charm'
I remember the first time I saw Japanese Anemones after moving to Portland...I thought they must be VERY delicate. HA! As anyone who has grown them knows...they are tough as nails...and bloom generously at a very good time!

anemone  2216
Anenome 'Honorine Jobert'
The standard white Anemone...such lovely, pure white blooms.

lobelia gerardii  2164
Lobelia gerardii
I found out that while these Lobelias definitely aren't what I'd ever call "drought-tolerant", they can get by on far less water than you'd think. Plus...they bloom for MONTHS!

knautia melton pastels  2190geranium ann folkard  2180
Knautia 'Melton PastelsGeranium 'Ann Folkard'

helenium mardi gras  2170
Helenium 'Mardi Gras'
This little Helenium has not had an easy year...getting totally swamped by the plants around it...but it still keeps blooming!

knautia  2150
Knautia macedonica
I can't say enough good things about Knautia...if you aren't averse to a plant that weaves all over...you simply must try it!

geranium rozanne  2165
Geranium 'Rozanne'
While the display on this Geranium isn't quite as heavy this month, it is still quite something to see. Such a nice cooling influence on the garden...which is very welcome when the temps start to rise!

agastache rupestris  2204astrantia ruby wedding  2192
Agastache rupestrisAstrantia 'Ruby Wedding'

eutrochium gateway  2162
Eutrochium (Eupatorium) 'Gateway'
While the Eutrochium in the rest of the garden have been blooming since July, the ones that I cut to the ground in June are just now blooming...what a nice surprise!

echinacea purpurea  2200
Echinacea purpurea 'Magnus'
Another classic of the late-summer garden...what would I do without their cheery blooms?

agastache purple haze  2211actea brunette  2163
Agastache 'Purple Haze'Cimicifuga 'Brunette'

clematis tibetana  2203
Clematis tibetana
As much as I love this vine...it's CRAZY! Not only has it grown all over the house itself, but it's growing out into the garden itself, ensnarling any plant that gets in it's path. I think a showdown is overdue ;-)

agastache blue blazes  2199
Agastache 'Blue Blazes'
Such a great Agastache...I can hardly believe that I don't need to water these...and they can still keep growing and blooming like they are on steroids!

agastache desert sunrise  2179
Agastache 'Desert Sunrise'
A lovely cross with Agastache Rupestris...inheriting it's delicate growth...but with flowers that are more on the pink side of the spectrum. These look AMAZING backlit.

I'm sure I've forgotten a few blooms (actually, now that I think of it...of course I did), but that's the bulk of it...see below for some wide shots around the gardens. The light at this time of year is just amazing...if not a little tricky to work around. For a look at what's blooming around the world, check out May Dreams Gardens...and happy GBBD!

front yard  2146
Front Garden From South

front yard  2147
Front Garden From North

backyard  2145
Back Garden from South

backyard  2226
Back Garden From North

Sunny Midday Garden  2101
Side Garden from West at Mid Day

Sunset on September
Side Garden from East at Sunset

108 comments:

  1. Gorgeous blooms and garden! I'm amazed at the many different plants are in there and how they all find room.

    Happy GBBD!

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    1. Thanks, Shirley...I think the plants would probably appreciate a bit more room, to be honest ;-)

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  2. Hey Scott,
    I like your style! Actually, I love your style. Nice closeups BTW!
    Excellent flowers and combinations for this GBBD. It's all so nice that it's hard to pick a favorite photo.
    Happy gardening up there.
    David/:0)

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    1. Thanks, David...glad you like it!!! I never would have thought, in the past, that I really had any certain style...but maybe I do, after all!

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  3. You have a lot of fall bloomers and get to enjoy your gardens that much longer. Considering this year I think your gardens still look good with lots going on.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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    1. Thanks, Cher...I really do tend to plant with Fall in mind as the "Grand Finale" :-)

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  4. wow bountiful blooms!!! what a sight ...the overview shots are impressive

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  5. Scott - your photos are absolutely breath-taking and 'gallery ready'. You've given me cause for doing some homework, with the incredible variety of blooms you have this time of year.

    With the brutal Summer we've had in the Midwest - there has been a lot of carnage in the gardens (even with periodic watering). All your blooms are gorgeous, but the Anemones and Agastache really caught my eye (i.e. deceptively delicate and ruggedly hardy).

    You also taught me a new word: umbel (my relative 'newbie-ism' comes out at times like this)

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    1. You all have really been beaten up this year, Shyrlene...my dad still lives in Nebraska...and it just sounds horrid :-(

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  6. Like you, I am so ready for some rain. You have lots of beautiful flowers, even though it's dry, a testament to your planting so many drought tolerant species. Everything still looks really lush in your overview shots. Thanks for posting!

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    1. You're so right, Alison, it really comes down to "right plant, right place".

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  7. Hi Scott,

    I don't suppose you need someone to come and look after your garden whilst you're at work, do you? ;)
    Beautiful, as always... I'm just off to daydream that I live in your house........

    :D

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    1. Hahahahaha...any time, Gwirrel...somebody should get to enjoy it!!!

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  8. It sounds like so many areas suffered lack of rain this year. Your garden looks wonderful and the images are beautiful. The photo of the Selinum is especially fine.

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    1. Thanks...I agree...the Selinum is VERY photogenic!

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  9. No shocker- everything looks beautiful! I love that Panicum. We do the Dallas Blue - another pretty one. I love to see what grows there and how things look at different times of the year.

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    1. Thanks, Kacky! I actually just planted a small 'Dallas Blues' a few weeks ago in my new stock tank planter...the foliage is just stunning!

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  10. Your grasses are really glorious right now. Makes me feel I need to revise my flowers to grasses ratio. And some of your flowers are going strong while mine have that "winter interest" look, eg Joe Pye Weed.

    I'm a big fan of Agastaches, that 'Desert Sunrise' is stunning.

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    1. I always feel that way around this time of year, Jason...and, to be honest, the past few years, I've been removing flowering plants to add in more grasses...and still feel like I could actually have more!

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  11. P.S. ... these photos that sure would look good up on PINTEREST! (not that there has been time for that)

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    1. You're so right, Shyrlene...I've been VERY neglectful of my Pinterest as of late...must remedy that soon :-)

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  12. Bravo! lovely blooms and wonderful photography.

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  13. Yowza again! I think you are making me like Rudbeckia, of all things, with that "into the light" view. What next, getting me to want dead aspens and chlorotic bluegrass, too? Thanks...inspiring, actually.

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    1. Hahahahahaha...I don't think my powers of persuasion are quite that strong, David ;-)

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  14. As usual, beautiful. I'd think you have two acres, not that small corner lot. You do wonders with it.

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    1. I certainly don't let any amount of space lay idle for long, James!

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  15. I think you have the most exuberant garden in all of Portland. So so so lovely.

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  16. Your garden is spectacular! I particularly like the way your plants have filled in the beds so nicely. My garden beds are only a few years old, and so I still have some empty space. My preferred look and my goal is to have it thick and full as you have demonstrated here. Beautiful!

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    1. That was absolutely my goal when I started too, Butterfly...and yes...it takes a few years before it really happens...but it is SOOOO satisfying to finally walk outside and not see a speck of bare soil ;-)

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  17. Oh Scott, your images are wondeful as usual.And that sidewalk action?? Splendid !!!

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    1. Hahahaha...I leave not bit of sidewalk uncovered ;-)

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  18. I would love to know how to crowd scape like you do. Love your close ups and the wide shots. You have the touch, man.

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    1. Hahahahaha...well, put together a love of plants and a limited amount of space and VOILA!

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  19. Your back garden has really grown since you planted it such a short time ago!! Must be wonderful to sit out there and enjoy the blooms and wildlife flitting about. I'm sure your neighbors love walking down the front sidewalk!!! Just gorgeous :-)

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    1. It really has Toni! I'm actually finding that I need to be much stricter at keeping it in bounds...I can't even walk through it at the moment!

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  20. Beautiful, as always Scott! I need to plant Agastache and Knautia--I'm always in awe of yours whenever I visit your blog!

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  21. Of course it goes without saying....but I'm saying it anyway, you're my Clematis tibetana hero! I also love the way you take over the sidewalk...

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    1. I have every confidence yours will be JUST as splendid someday soon ;-)

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  22. I love seeing those long shots. It looks like your back garden is giving you some privacy already.

    Gorgeous black foliage on the 'Bertram Anderson', too.

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    1. Thanks, Zoey...I can't wait for some real privacy back there!!!

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  23. Wonderful photos Scott! I had to give up on my Persicaria Polymorpha, couldn't control it on the narrow path. I love the look of firetail. You really do have some great fall blooming plants.

    Eileen

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    1. I'm actually thinking the same thing about mine, Eileen! It's so lovely, but just a bit of a brute for the spot I've got it in!

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  24. Your plant combinations are always such an inspiration! I especially like the prairie combinations of blooms and grasses. Hope you get some rain soon!

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    1. Thanks, Karin...those are pretty much my faves too :-)

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  25. Wow...beautiful as always! Your combinations and color are wonderful and I love your Verbena, Rudbeckia and grasses. Fall in your gardens is spectacular!!!

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    1. I really do plan for that Fall Finale ;-)

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  26. I can honestly say two things: I have never been over summer, and you have mad photography skills. Happy GBBD!

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  27. Still a lot going on in your fabulous garden, Scott. I'm glad you showed long-shots as well as macros. Can't pick a favorite this time. You are such an inspiration.

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    1. Awww, thanks Pam...we all inspire each other, don't we!

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  28. I especially enjoyed seeing the long views from the north/south, etc. Breathtakingly gorgeous photos as always. Yours is the standard I aspire to live up to!

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    1. That is quite a compliment, Sheri...I'm blushing :-)

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  29. Stunning as always! My garden and I are also ready for rain and spring again just not so sure about December - March.

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    1. I know the feeling...the rain is one thing...but it can get a tad monotonous after a few months!

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  30. Amazing how the back garden has filled in. My selinum has survived the summer, which leads me to believe its tougher than I thought, so I'm going to move it from a comfy large pot and plant it when things cool down. I did see one smallish bloom from it in early summer. Beautiful fall garden, Scott. I'm wondering if you grow veronicastrum too.

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    1. Isn't Selinum divine, Denise...I love it so much...and yes...I do have a few different Veronicastrum...a lavender variety called 'Fascination' and a white variety called (unsurprisingly) 'Alba'...I adore them!

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  31. Gorgeous late summer post, Scott. You may be over summer, but you do her offerings proud. Lovely to see your Agastaches and Echinacea featured. Seeing yours in previous posts, then in person, is the reason that I finally (after 20+ gardening years) bought an echinacea from Viscaya's sale last week! Do you feel powerful?

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    1. OMG...I do indeed! I would love to act like Johnny EchinaceaSeed...scattering them in every garden around Portland :-)

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  32. Every post is like a magazine article with garden-porn pictures, Scott. You sure know how to capture that golden light!

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    1. Awwww...thanks quite the compliment coming from you, Pam!

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  33. Funny how we both decided to cut the "chit chat" this time. You may be tired of summer, but it is obviously not done with you yet.

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  34. Wow, Scott! Your place is looking awesome! It looks to me that it is getting a second wind after the hot, dry summer. One can't tell that the back yard is newly planted.

    I hope things wind down a bit at work so you can spend more time out there. I have had different things going on, including some health issues, so I haven't gotten as much done as I'd like, but I am enjoying the cooler weather, and have found some time to just sit outside, and watch the insects and hummers.

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    1. Oh no, Sue! I hope you're on the mend...at least the cooler weather makes it more pleasant outside when we have things we have to get done, right?

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  35. I am always amazed at the number of plants you manage to squeeze into your garden, and how incredibly they all seem to do! This is the time of year when I start to get that "need to tidy" itch, and it's been aggravated by our own crazy heat and dry weather this summer. Persicaria "Firetail" is one that seems to thrive on our weather here. Now I need to go out and plant a "Rozanne" at its base; what an awesome combination that must be!

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    1. It's my own patented technique of crowdscaping, Tim ;-) I'm sort of the same...I tidied up a bit last weekend and it was amazing how much better everything looked...even though I really just swept up dead leaves off the sidewalks!

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  36. Your summer stressed plants look great. I wish mine could look half as good. If you did not see it, I responded to your question on my blog.

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    1. Thanks so much! And yes...I saw your response, thank you! I think that might have been the problem with my other Muhlenbergia...the thatch from several years of not cutting back...hmmm.

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  37. Wow, as always, superbly done. Even if maybe your garden is in chaos (which it is not), you can always present them very beautifully. I bet you can make a very ugly garden look so terrific with your shots.

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    1. Awwww...well, I'd certainly try, Andrea ;-)

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  38. Your garden is amazing!! To have it looking that pretty mid September after all the heat and no rain it great. I have no luck with Japanese anemone, it spreads everywhere and doesn't bloom. I just cut back my 'Rozanne' and it's already got new flowers, I love that plant. I'm jealous of your Astranias, mine are dried up seedheads now.

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    1. Isn't 'Rozanne' fabulous...she just keeps on looking good! To be honest, that's the ONLY Astrantia still blooming, the rest definitely are just dried up seedheads!

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  39. It's all looking wonderfully full and blowsy. Will have to try again with Agastaches next year, as we only have one dwarf one at the minute that I bought in the summer. (Planted bareroots of a selection of some of the usual suspects last year, but none surfaced, alas...)

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    1. I love that word...blowsy! Good luck with your Agastache...they can be tricky for lots of folks...but are so worth the effort!

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  40. Wow! Breathtaking! I could look at those photos for hours. You really have a very beautiful garden. It looks lovely. Wow!

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  41. So inspiring, I'm still in the death throes of fighting invasive grasses and blackberry vines on my 2 acres. I would love to have a smaller garden where I had a chance, I am trying some of your plants to see if they will fill in for me, you are the master of covering every inch with lovely plants. Hopefully more will bloom next year. I have some tiny Vernonia seedlings just up, I don't know if they can bloom next year or not. Your garden is a vision of loveliness.

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    1. OMG...sounds like you totally have your hands full. I admit, I would LOVE to have a larger property...but you are so right...there is A LOT of work involved with a space that big!

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    2. OOPS...and congrats on your Vernonia seedlings! I don't know if they'll bloom the first year...but most likely, will bloom in their 2nd year...and they are SO worth the wait!

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  42. You've definitely got a very special garden, Scott. I love the Persicaria with the grasses and the purple Agastache with the Knautia. Just gorgeous! I hope work slows down so you can get home before dark.

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    1. Thanks, Grace ;-) Me too...it was fairly quiet last week...and I spent a good amount of time in the garden this past weekend...thanks to our lovely weather!

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  43. Wow, your garden is still blooming like crazy. I love all of the layers of plants! I might have to try some rudbeckia next year for some of that cheery color.

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    1. They are pretty darn invaluable for that late summer/early autumn color...and so easy!

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  44. I'm convinced you could have nothing in bloom and still take mesmerizing garden with the way you use light. Beautiful!

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    1. Awww, thanks Sue...the light certainly makes everything seem more glamorous, doesn't it!

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    http://www.inuwtuin.nl/buitenverlichting

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  46. Exquisite! You have the most wonderful collection.

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  47. Beautiful as always, Scott. My favorites are the anemones. I unexpectedly saw some September Charms at a local big box store and made an impulse buy; now I have to figure out WHERE to put it! You've got me thinking about agastache as well, too, and knautia.

    I was in Washington DC over the weekend, and it was very obvious in the gardens there that the summer was very dry indeed.

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    1. It was such a bear of a summer for SO MANY, wasn't it? I feel very fortunate that, even though it was dry and hotter than I'd like, we still had it pretty easy here in the PNW.

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  48. Oooh, love all that afternoon light in your photos. Am I the only one in love with September light? It's somehow better than summer evenings light, I think. Lovely plants. Anemones haven't been sturdy for me - our winters are a bit too cold, I think. Several attempts have failed. Lovely in your garden, though.

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    1. Not at all...I love the light right now...I'm always racing out to get photos as the light changes!

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  49. You captured mid-September just perfectly.

    Have you ever thought of adding a big honking dinner plate Dahlia somewhere amidst all those delicate, wispy umbels and spikes? Would be a fun contrast...

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    1. Hahahaha...you know, I do think about it from time to time...but those big blooms scare me!

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  50. So when do find time to take care of the garden. The one comment about taking over the sidewalk is familiar to me, as I received a visit from code compliance. Lets just say my plants have had a growth retardant done to them. Love the joe pye. I haven't had much success with it due to it's love of moisture. Great GBBD!

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    1. Well, aside from watering, the garden is pretty much on it's own for a while, Greggo! I was so sad to see your neighbors turned you in...so lame! Joe Pye really does like a bit of moisture...but I do tend to indulge it, since I love it so much ;-)

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  51. For this late in the year, looks like you still have plenty of blooms. And I love the Black & Blue Salvia...don't really know why, but I think blue flowers are my very favorite!

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    1. I'm with you on the Salvia...it's really stunning...especially when they get really large and are covered in blooms!

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  52. Hi Scott! Your garden always leaves me with my mouth open... Your pictures are nice as usual. I wonder what that dark leaved grass in the bucket is... A pennisetum? Do you recover it in winter?

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    1. Hi Alberto...you're so sweet :-) Yes...it's a Pennisetum named 'Vertigo', it's supposed to be hardy here in Portland...but it's sort of borderline-hardy...so we'll see if it really overwinters ;-)

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  53. Hey Scott,
    i don't know how i've managed it but somehow i missed your GBBD. i just ADORE your garden, the photos and all the different plants in it, and all the little hints and tips that i pick up.

    i really like all of the photos where the plants are back lit in the sunset, just amazing.
    and the fact that you manage to fit in so much stuff into you garden is so cool... i love a good full garden :)

    before i started following your blog i wasn't the biggest fan of grasses but now i'm hooked :)

    i look forward to your next GBBD in the next few days

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    1. Hi Michael...so glad you found my little blog here on the other side of the world! I'm excited you've discovered the awesome beauty fo grasses...and you probably have quite a few interesting varieties in Australia, I'd imagine! Actually...that would be fascinating...I know so little about the flora of Oz!!!

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    2. from what i've seen there is nothing little about your blog :) it is absolutely fantastic, and i must say that it is ENTIRELY your fault that i have been wearing my hoodie for the past 2 days and i must say it has been amazingly comfortable and i'd never noticed how brilliant they are for gardening

      it's funny, you know so little about aussie flora and i know little about american flora :) together we should be able to overcome this :) hehehehe

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