Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Foliage Follow-Up - May 2013

FFU May 2013 Header
Last week, we celebrated flowers, and today we take a look at foliage in the garden, after all, a great garden should balance both, right? Head on over to Pam's site Digging for more FFU posts as well as Christina's Creating my own garden of the Hesperides for Garden Blogger's Foliage Day!

Shady Foliage
I have to admit, the shady area around the north side of our house is a bit of a foliage hodge-podge. I probably fell into the trap of "one of everying-itis". Oh well...that's the downfall of the plant-obsessed, right?

Fresh rodgersiaShady exuberance
While our early heat a few weeks ago caused most of the Rodgersias to prematurely go green, the new leaves still show the nice bronze coloring. Several varieties of Rodgersia dominate this space, and they seem to finally be settling in, and are really clumping up.

Agastache Golden Jubilee
Agastache 'Golden Jubilee' is one of those great plants with gorgeous foliage and flowers...love it!

Selinum wallichianum
One of my absolute favorite plants, Selinum wallichianum, has leaves so finely-divided they make ferns jealous!

Persicaria lance corporal
For dramatic foliage patterning, you can't beat Persicaria 'Lance Corporal'. It manages to be dramatic without being ostentatious!

Persicaria et alPersicaria and malva
Persicarias are great foliage plants, tough and adaptable. On the left, again, is 'Lance Corporal', and on the right, 'Red Dragon'...probably the most-grown Persicaria in Portland gardens.

Sedum sieboldii
I do love the ghostly blue foliage of Sedum sieboldii...and as a bonus, it turns vibrant shades of yellow and red in autumn.

Sedum Matrona
My favorite tall Sedum, 'Matrona'. I love the pewtery leaves and contrasting red stems.

Sanguisorbia mensiezii
A recent purchase, Sanguisorbia mensiezii...love these blue-gray, serrated leaves...almost like a miniature melianthus.

Persicaria purple fantasy
The newest in my collection of Persicarias, 'Purple Fantasy'. The dramatic color definitely gets more muted as the season progresses, but that's fine by me, as the contrasting chevron is still very apparent.

LupineHosta and Rodgersia 2
Lupines are prized for their blooms (and rightly so) but their foliage is so beautiful (while it lasts). On the right is my favorite Hosta, 'Big Daddy'...and this year it's really starting to live up to it's name...a good 2.5' tall and probably 5-6' wide...LOVE those blue leaves!

Hosta Big Daddy
Another shot of 'Big Daddy', I'm really pleased by how the Oxalis have colonized around the other plants, blanketing the area.

Panicum Northwind
Panicum 'Northwind' may be one of the finest grasses I've ever grown. It doesn't have the wonderful red coloring of many of the Panicums, but it is remarkably upright and has this wonderfully steely-blue coloring.

Oregano Sedum Anementhale
Another foliage-centric combo in one of my parking strips, with Origanum 'Aureus', Sedum 'Matrona' and Anemethale lessoniana.

Eutrochium GatewayEutrochium Chocolate
Eutrochium 'Gateway' is probably one of my top 5 garden plants...I can't imagine having a garden without it. Great, imposing structure, reddish-purple stems, wonderful mauve flowers (that bees go crazy for) and lush, serrated foliage that appears in whorls along the length of the stems. On the right is the related, Eutrochium rugosum...grown primarily for it's chocolatey-colored foliage.

Veronicastrum fascination
Another graceful plant that produces leaves in whorls (who doesn't like saying that), Veronicastrum 'Fascination'.

Cimicifuga
I honestly don't know if I'm supposed to call this Cimicifuga or Actaea anymore...but who cares, the foliage is still gorgeous, although it's usually much darker than this.

Panicum Huron Solstice
While talking about grasses last week, Heather mentioned that her Panicum 'Shenandoah' was already showing some red coloring in it's leaves. Of course, I ran home in tears, totally defeated. As luck would have it, I was able to dry my eyes the next day, as my Shenandoah was also showing some red coloring. Above is another Panicum, 'Huron Solstice'.

Agastache Purple Haze
While most of them aren't necessarily grown for their foliage, many Agastache do have nice coloring, especially on their newer foliage, as you can see here in Agastache 'Purple Haze'.

Agastache rupestrisAnementhale lessoniana
The Agastache on the left (Agastache rupestris) could hardly look more different from 'Purple Haze' in the previous photo. While the peachy-orange blooms of this Agastache are ok, I actually like the soft, gray foliage even more. On the right, another Anementhale lessoniana, this one located in the backyard.

acaena
After seeing Ricki's large colony of Acaena inermis 'Purpurea' this spring, I can't help but be a little perturbed that my own plants aren't nearly as vigorous...oh well...they are still pretty...and I can be patient...right?

Amsonia hubrichtii
While it's hard to ignore the multitude of blooms right now, the real reason to grow Amsonia hubrichtii is for the wonderful, thread-like foliage. It forms a substantial, shrub-like mass in the garden after flowering, and turns a wonderful golden color in autumn.

Back Yard
In the backyard, I have to admit, one of the things I'm most pleased about this year is the fact that the Parthenocissus is finally starting to really cover the fence. For some reason, it makes the garden feel more established.

Front Garden
Ahhh...spring...don't you just love all that fresh, new foliage!

Geranium and Clematis
Again, Happy Foliage Follow-Up and Garden Bloggers Foliage Day!!!

71 comments:

  1. You have some of the best foliage plants in your collection. I always enjoy looking through the photos.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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  2. Gorgeous foliage and fabulous photography as always! It's great to see your Persicaria 'Purple Fantasy' as the one I purchased a month ago is still in it's pot waiting for the lazy gardener at this place to do something with it.

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    1. Amazingly, I found a spot for that Persicaria almost immediately (well, if you consider 2 weeks immediately, which I do)!

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  3. I grow the persicaria "Red Dragon" and it is very nice. I didn't know about the other varieties available. I'd like to try them.

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    1. It's a winner, for sure, Phillip! I can try to give you some cuttings of those others, next month, if you like...let me know!

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  4. I love looking for good foliage combos and pictures at this time of year, it's no work at all. Everything is so fresh and vibrant. By fall, it's another matter entirely. That last shot is marvelous!

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    1. Hahaha...so true, Alison, in spring, it almost seems too easy!

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  5. Another great garden tour Scott. I'll be interested in seeing how your Big Daddy hosta grows this year. I planted a large leaf cultivar named Empress Wu, but she is not wooing me right now. She doesn't seem very happy in her garden placement. May need to move her into a sunnier spot. Love the Persicaria 'Lance Corporal' may have to plant some in an area that lacks a good ground cover. I fear none of my agastache have returned. They seem happier in Portland than Seattle.

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    1. I'm hoping Big Daddy continues to earn his name, Tom...so far, so good! Let me know if you want some seeds from 'Lance Corporal' this fall...it reseeds VERY easily!

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  6. So beautiful foliage images you show us! I'm not sure that I know them all! So interesting,I love gardens.Nice to meet you.
    Olympia

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    1. So glad you enjoyed the post, Olympia!

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  7. Gorgeous Scott! As always. Love all of those combos. Totally understand the one-of-everything-itis!

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    1. Hahahaha...sometimes, it just happens, right Jen?

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  8. I LOVE the foliage hodge-podge shot at the top, just perfect in my opinion. Also seeing that pic of your back garden reminds me I meant to ask if I could take a look back there before I left last Sunday, darn. It looks so different from when I saw it last summer and it was packed full of happy plants.

    You have me considering another persicaria...

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    1. What Loree said--I love that first shot!

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    2. Thanks for quelling my insecurity, ladies :-) You're both welcome to take a look in the back yard any time...and do let me know if either of you wants some of those Persicarias...most root easily from cuttings...and others I sometimes can find seedlings of in the garden ;-)

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  9. Hi Scott,

    Beautiful foliage and beautiful photos as always!
    I think I may have to move to Portland, seems to me the weather is a great mix of mild winters, rain and hot summers without being too hot like Florida or Cali....

    I love your Acaena inermis 'Purpurea' and how Oxalis is growing underneath other plants; it's leaves are so gorgeous and of course there's the added bonus of blooms a little later in the season!

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    1. I have to say, Liz, that Portland has some great weather, for the most part...never cold and rarely too hot :-)

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  10. Scott - your garden is just gorgeous. My kind of garden!
    This one blog alone has just had me adding numerous plants to my ever extending wish list. So many new ones for me - I need to do research now!
    Oddly enough, I lost my Persicaria Red Dragon this winter. I thought they were pretty much indestructible!

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    1. Oh no, Angie...I'm so sad about your 'Red Dragon'...I also thought it was impossible to kill!

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  11. You are a foliage master!!!! I love how you group your plants...so much. And your vine photo is just beautiful - is that your favorite patio to hang out?

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    1. It's both my favorite patio...and our only patio, Heather ;-) I love sitting back there...watching the bees and hummingbirds :-)

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  12. Naturally it's all lovely but I keep going back to that first shot. Who cares if it's one of this and one of that, the combination is sheer perfection. The foliage Persicaria that seeds all over for me is 'Painter's Pallette'. Damn if I can't get Red Dragon to make it through a winter.

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    1. Thanks, Sue...I don't feel so self-conscious about it now :-) Oh yes, I think 'Painter's Palette' is basically the same as 'Lance Corporal', the patterning of the leaves is just different.

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  13. Your garden. Is lovely Scott, flowers then and now foliage. Love the vine clinging and draping on your fence, looks so elegant!

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    1. Thanks, guys...I adore that vine...especially in the fall when it turns bright red...LOVE IT!

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  14. you should have named this one variations on 50 shades of GREEN!!!!never mind I will use this later haha

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    1. Hahahaha...that's PERFECT, Sharon...I may just steal it yet for a future post ;-)

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  15. Wow, I loved looking at your foliage..you have a extensive and stunning collection.

    So many of them I recognize from our coastal White Rock climate...and sadly many of them will not do well up here where it's too dry, and rot, and cold, and snowy...lol.

    But it's so good to see them in your garden.

    Jen

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    1. That's the way of it, isn't it, Jen...and there are things we can't quite grow here, since we don't have the extremes of hot/cold...sigh!

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  16. I don't grow any Persicaria but you're making me feel I can't afford to be without it. I do have Veronicastrum Fascination - mine is not as far along as yours, but it is a great plant. I like that golden color on your Agastache. I just have the straight species.

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    1. You need some Persicaria, Jason, it would look perfect in your garden! I have the straight species of Agastasche too, and love them both :-)

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  17. Love all of this Scott! I had to give up Persicaria, still pulling out pieces of it, too large for my narrow pathway. I just ringed my Panicum Northwind in the alley garden this morning because it leans forward due to the fence. I have Amsonia Northwind Select (not on the market except at Northwind Perennial Farm) and I still cannot figure out the difference. When I talk to Roy Diblik again I will ask why the Select is better than Hubrechtii.

    Eileen

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    1. Hahahaha...you have to let me know the difference when you find out about the Amsonia, Elieen!

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  18. I expected the grasses (you have the "grass blog" in my mind), but your other foliage plants are just as beautiful. As before, I'm particularly smitten by Persicaria 'Lance Corporal'. But that blue sedum is also stunning.

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    1. 'Lance Corporal' is definitely a fave, Pam, and it's so easy to grow!

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  19. I'm sure persicaria starts would prove highly popular at future swaps (we're a greedy bunch, dontcha know). Your acaena looks happy enough to reward your patience. My big swath of it started from one 4" pot. Two others languished and died.

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    1. Good to know about the Acaena, Ricki, you've given me hope. Note taken about the Persicaria...I'll start some cuttings :-)

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  20. Love your foliage photos as well as the many bloom photos you posted previously. Great gardens!

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    1. Thanks, Joene...so glad you enjoyed them!

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  21. You had me at "Big Daddy" - Gorgeous pictures as always.

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  22. Scott what a great display of so much foliage...I love how you fill the space with the various colors of green and bronzes. I just saw some lupines blooming in the meadow...love them.

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  23. That last photo looks like Clematis recta 'Purpurea' but I didn't see you name it so maybe not. Whatever it is, I bet that's Geranium 'Ann Folkard' next-door, which is a brilliant idea. Love the Persicaria 'Purple Fantasy' too -- love it all!

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    1. You are right on the mark, Denise! I must have forgotten to label that last photo, oops!

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  24. What a wonderful post about the foliage. To me in my small garden a very important thing. Thanks for sharing all this beauty Scott
    Have a wonderful weekend ahead.

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    1. Thanks for stopping by, Marijke, so glad you liked the post :-)

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  25. Your garden is looking amazing and what lovely foliage throughout.

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  26. You have some beautiful leafy things going on in your garden. The freshness and incredible diversity make it a joy to look at, no bright flowers needed! The simple things, like sedum and lupines, are just as lovely as the more exotic looking foliage.

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    1. I totally agree, sometimes the "common" plants are even better than those rare ones :-)

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  27. Your garden is mind-bogglingly AMAZING! Just packed with fabulous foliage. I think my favorite combo is that golden oregano with sedum and the grass. And that chartreuse geranium - wow! I'm taking notes here...

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    1. I was super-pleased by those combos, they were a bit of good luck, I think :-)

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  28. I personally prefer gardens with a hodgepodge of foliage. And your Big Daddy hosta is gorgeous! Where do you recommend finding persicarias? I didn't realize that I needed a 'Purple Fantasty' until this post. Thanks!

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    1. I've had the best luck finding Persicarias at Joy Creek...I got most of mine there. 'Purple Fantasy' I just stumbled upon at Dancing Oaks...and I grabbed the last one...hopefully they have more now :-)

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  29. I suffer a bit from "one of everying-itis" too, my garden is tiny and I see so many things I want - and now I found something new in your post; Persicarias, 'Purple Fantasy' - lovely! Well, they are all lovely, but some more than other.
    Oh, by the way, I grow Parthenocissus too, I have two 9 year old Parthenocissus henryana plants, as Bonsai trees! Well worth a visit if you haven't seen them yet, you can easily make the same from yours.

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    1. A Parthenocissus bonsai...that's outstanding!!!

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  30. How fabulous! I too had never seen or heard of Persicaria 'Purple Fantasy'. I need to find that. What a beauty. Yes spring is wonderful with all the brand new, pristine foliage. Great post and great photos as always!

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    1. "Purple Fantasy' is a great plant...I think you'll start seeing it around more...it's the perfect size for smaller gardens :-)

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  31. Fantastic, Scott! Amazing you do all that you do in such a small space!

    R

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    1. And it seems to be getting smaller all the time, Riz ;-)

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  32. I have TOTAL Rodgersia envy! And I hang my head in regretful shame - I managed to kill my Panicum 'Shenandoah' last summer. All power to you - you have a beautiful garden!

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    1. It took those Rodgersias YEARS to look that good...they seem to finally be happy! So sad about your 'Shenandoah'...those are practically impossible to kill!

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  34. Eutrochium.....holy smokes - I missed that name change - but Eupatorium or Eutrochium - a great group of plants. And Gateway is magnificent. Have mine combined with a bunch of big girls - Persicaria polymorphs & a big Rudbeckia. I think my favourite is E. coelistinum. That oregano is to die-for - edible, or just gorgeous?
    B.

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    1. The scary thing, Barbara, is I think they just changed the names AGAIN!!! I cannot keep up! I really want that E. coelistinum...but I've heard it can be a bit of a thug...what's your experience been with it?

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